Sunday, December 07, 2008

Arresting The Drug War


Barry Cooper a former narcotics officer has decided to turn the tables on his old buddies. It is not pretty. Unless of course you consider just deserts pretty. Also note that the girl they are trying to get out of jail, Yolanda Madden, is white. As I keep saying - if enforcement on the white community was handled the same way that it is handled on the black community the drug war wouldn't last a month. And occasionally the police overstep their bounds. They forget their place. They forget that white people have money and friends and damn good imaginations.
Barry Cooper, a former Texas police officer with eight years of specialty in drug interdiction, first made waves when he released the film "Never Get Busted Again," a how-to guide for evading police drug seizures.

Austin, Texas-based Cooper's latest project is not nearly so benign, and will likely generate for the former drug warrior an army of enemies in law enforcement.

'KopBusters' is a reality TV program that aims to sink crooked officers.

"KopBusters rented a house in Odessa, Texas and began growing two small Christmas trees under a grow light similar to those used for growing marijuana," claims a release from NeverGetBusted.com "When faced with a suspected marijuana grow, the police usually use illegal FLIR cameras and/or lie on the search warrant affidavit claiming they have probable cause to raid the house. Instead of conducting a proper investigation which usually leads to no probable cause, the Kops lie on the affidavit claiming a confidential informant saw the plants and/or the police could smell marijuana coming from the suspected house."

"The trap was set and less than 24 hours later, the Odessa narcotics unit raided the house only to find KopBuster's attorney waiting under a system of complex gadgetry and spy cameras that streamed online to the KopBuster's secret mobile office nearby.
Of course the police need to bust a certain number of white folks to keep the drug war from looking like a racist enterprise.

So how do police turn false arrests into convictions? Testilying.
Testilying is U. S. police slang for the practice of giving false testimony against a defendant in a criminal trial, typically for the purpose of "making a stronger case" against someone they believe to be guilty, although it may also be for the purpose of framing an innocent defendant.

The word and its meaning have been publicized by defense attorney Alan Dershowitz, notably in a 1994 New York Times article, "Accomplices to Perjury," in which he said:
As I read about the disbelief expressed by some prosecutors... I thought of Claude Rains's classic response, in Casablanca on being told there was gambling in Rick's place: "I'm shocked—shocked." For anyone who has practiced criminal law in the state or Federal courts, the disclosures about rampant police perjury cannot possibly come as a surprise. "Testilying"—as the police call it—has long been an open secret among prosecutors, defense lawyers, and judges.
There seems to be little doubt that the practice occurs, is not limited to any region of the country, and that "testilying" is a common name for it. A 2003 Boston Globe editorial noted:
In the early 1990s, the Mollen Commission peeled away layers of falsehood in the New York City Police Department, including false statements on warrant applications, creation of confidential informants out of whole cloth, and lies told to establish probable cause for stopping and searching vehicles. So-called "testilying," however, is not limited to any one area or police department. The problem has become so acute that juries nationwide routinely express skepticism about law enforcement testimony, such as drugs found "in plain view."
The LAPD is said to call the practice "joining the liars' club."
I'd say what we have here is a break down of law and order.

Once the system starts turning on itself the end is nigh. Which is why organizations like Law Enforcement Against Prohibition can make such a big difference in putting an end to this travesty and tragedy. This new reality show can't hurt either.

You can watch a YouTube video of the cops aw shit moment. And a visit to the Never Get Busted Forums might be of interest as well.

Cross Posted at Classical Values

1 comment:

rumcrook said...

thats great. checks and balances